Archive for Photo Gallery – Page 3

Carvings In The Canada Library of Parliament

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© Library of Par­lia­ment

The Cana­da Library of Par­lia­ment is a Goth­ic Revival build­ing on a bluff over­look­ing the Ottawa Riv­er.  The build­ing, opened in 1876, has a rough exte­ri­or of Nepean sand­stone with mas­sive fly­ing but­tress­es.   The inte­ri­or is a con­trast­ing mix of col­or and tex­tures, high­light­ed by hand-carved white pine pan­els fea­tur­ing myth­i­cal beasts, masks, flow­ers and more.

Typ­i­cal­ly, vis­i­tors to the Library are allowed only a short dis­tance into the main read­ing room, and are not per­mit­ted to take pho­tos.  Sev­er­al years ago Don But­ler was able to secure a tour with per­mis­sion to take as many pho­tos as he desired.   But­ler notes that there are eight door­ways, each with 10 large carv­ings, 4 medi­um carv­ing and 6 small­er carv­ing for a total of 160 carved medal­lions.  In addi­tion, there are false post tops and small rosettes in the cor­ner of some pan­els.  The library his­to­ri­an esti­mat­ed there were some 4,500 of these small­er carv­ings in total.

© Library of Parliament

© Library of Par­lia­ment

In this first gallery, we are hap­py to present a taste­ful selec­tion of the medal­lions, as well as sev­er­al of the larg­er pan­els.  To vis­it the gallery click HERE.  More of Butler’s pho­tos will be pre­sent­ed in future gal­leries.

To learn more about the Library of Par­lia­ment, click HERE to vis­it their web site.  Pho­tos of Library of Par­lia­ment exte­ri­or and inte­ri­or copy­right Cana­da Library of Par­lia­ment and used here with per­mis­sion.

Images in the pho­to gallery copy­right Don But­ler.  Vis­it his web site at thecarvinggloveguy.com or click HERE

2015 Santa And Friends Gallery


TBerrySantasign

Welcome to the 2015 Santa (And Friends) Photo Gallery.   

DaveSabol-02

San­ta Bak­er by David Sabol

This is the four­teenth annu­al San­ta Gallery, and I am always pleased by the vari­ety and qual­i­ty of the carv­ings includ­ed.  Tip ‘o the hat to all those who sub­mit­ted carv­ings, and a reminder for every­one else to plan on par­tic­i­pat­ing in the gallery in 2016.  To vis­it the 2015 Gallery click HERE, or click on WOM in the menu above, then click on WOM Gal­leries.

Thanks to Tim Berry for use of his San­ta Carv­ings sign.

 

International Woodcarvers Congress 2015 Winner Galleries

Rick Harney's Best of Show winner at the 2015 International Woodcarvers Congress.

Rick Harney’s Best of Show win­ner at the 2015 Inter­na­tion­al Wood­carvers Con­gress.

Assem­bling the pho­to gallery for the Inter­na­tion­al Wood­carv­er Con­gress Win­ners has always been the great­est amount of work of any sin­gle arti­cle in WOM, but I know I’ll be work­ing with great pho­tos of great carv­ings.  The 2015 IWC Gallery was no excep­tion, start­ing with Rick Harney’s Best of Show win­ner.   This edi­tion has some 296 pho­tos (twice that num­ber if you count the thumb­nails) includ­ing some of the best carv­ings you will see any­where.  In the win­ner gal­leries you’ll find 162 of pho­tog­ra­ph­er Marc Feath­er­ly’s excel­lent stu­dio pho­tos of the win­ners at IWC 2015, includ­ing more pho­tos of the Best of Show win­ner.

In addi­tion to the gallery of the prize-win­ning carv­ings, you’ll also find Marc’s can­did pho­tos from the Class­es, Award Ban­quet, the Judges, the Show floor, and oth­er pho­tos around and about dur­ing Con­gress.

As always, the pho­tos in the winner’s gallery are click­able, and will take you to much larg­er ver­sions of these great carv­ings.  (Much larg­er then you’ll see in any paper pub­li­ca­tion.)  The large pho­tos will afford you the oppor­tu­ni­ty to real­ly look at the win­ners in detail.

To vis­it the gal­leries, in the menu bar above click on WOM, then on The Gal­leries menu item, or click HERE.   Enjoy!

Call for Photos: Santa Gallery ’15

TBerrySantasign

San­ta Carv­ing sign by Tim Berry

 

UPDATE —  the due date to sub­mit pho­tos of your Santa/seasonal carv­ings has been extend­ed to the end of Novem­ber.   Please sub­mit as soon as pos­si­ble.

The Annu­al San­ta Gallery will once again grace the pages of November/December issue of WOM. You are invit­ed to sub­mit pho­tos of favorite San­tas or oth­er sea­son­al item you’ve carved in the last 12 to 18 months.

Sub­mis­sions should be sent to womed­i­torATcom­castDOTnet; alter­nate­ly, you may send a link to a gallery such as Flickr that stores files at their orig­i­nal size.

Please include the fol­low­ing infor­ma­tion with your high qual­i­ty pho­tos:

Title of Carv­ing

Size (approx)

Mate­r­i­al

Fin­ish

About the design:

  • From your own design?
  • Carved in a class led by …
  • Inspired by a design by …
  • From a rough out by …
  • From a pat­tern by …
  • Etc …

 Sub­mis­sions due no lat­er than Novem­ber 30

 

Ques­tions, queries, posers? Send email to womed­i­torATcom­castDOTnet

Call for Photos: Santa Gallery ’15

TBerrySantasign

San­ta Carv­ing sign by Tim Berry

The Annu­al San­ta Gallery will once again grace the pages of November/December issue of WOM. You are invit­ed to sub­mit pho­tos of favorite San­tas or oth­er sea­son­al item you’ve carved in the last 12 to 18 months.

Sub­mis­sions should be sent to womed­i­torATcom­castDOTnet; alter­nate­ly, you may send a link to a gallery such as Flickr that stores files at their orig­i­nal size.

Please include the fol­low­ing infor­ma­tion with your high qual­i­ty pho­tos:

Title of Carv­ing

Size (approx)

Mate­r­i­al

Fin­ish

About the design:

  • From your own design?
  • Carved in a class led by …
  • Inspired by a design by …
  • From a rough out by …
  • From a pat­tern by …
  • Etc …

 Sub­mis­sions due no lat­er than Octo­ber 15

 

Ques­tions, queries, posers? Send email to womed­i­torATcom­castDOTnet

2014 Artistry In Wood Photo Galleries

Artistry In Wood 2014 Photo Galleries

Pho­tog­ra­phy by Marc Feath­er­ly

To vis­it the Gallery pages, click the links below, or the Gal­leries link in the menu bar to the left.

Artistry in Wood 2014 Carv­ing Win­ners — click HERE

Artistry in Wood 2014 Wood­work­ing Win­ners - click HERE

2014 Artistry in Wood Casu­al Pho­tosclick HERE

Susan Alexander’s “Let’s Talk Carving” Issue 8

Susan bio shot  This Ain’t Your Grandmother’s Bird­house!

Please refer to and fol­low all man­u­fac­tur­ers’ direc­tions.

What I love about wood­carv­ing is that you nev­er know where it will take you – geo­graph­i­cal­ly, phys­i­cal­ly, philo­soph­i­cal­ly, or sculp­tural­ly. There will always be some­thing, around the next bend, that you nev­er could even imag­ine.

While attend­ing Rick Jensen’s bark pow­er carv­ing class, at Gene Webb’s School of Wood­carv­ing, I saw a carv­er, in the back row, qui­et­ly carv­ing a mon­strous piece of bark. His name was Howard L. Atwood.

Howard hails from Asheville, North Car­oli­na and has been carv­ing since 2008. His bird­hous­es have been con­sis­tent award-win­ners. One of his entries won a first prize of $1,000, plus two-nights at a bed and break­fast, includ­ing din­ner! Howard told me his bark carv­ings have been great­ly influ­enced by Carv­ing Illustrated’s 2014 Carv­er of the Year, Rick Jensen. After watch­ing Rick’s DVD, Carv­ing Mag­i­cal Tree Hous­es, Howard decid­ed to take Rick’s bark carv­ing class. That was sev­en years ago. Howard has tak­en Rick’s class every year since then.

Rick Jensen's DVD, "Carving Magical Tree Houses"

Rick Jensen’s DVD, “Carv­ing Mag­i­cal Tree Hous­es”

The size of the bark, used in these pho­tos, is approx­i­mate­ly 24” high by 20” deep and 18” wide. Rick Jensen glued up more than 8 indi­vid­ual pieces of bark for Howard’s bird­house.

One of Howard Atwood's "Ultimate Birdhouse"

One of Howard Atwood’s “Ulti­mate Bird­house”

It's those perfect circular openings that caught my attention.

It’s those per­fect cir­cu­lar open­ings that caught my atten­tion.

The unique roof line brings your eye to the nest.

The unique roof line brings your eye to the nest.

The side view shows perfect proportions to the sculpture.

The side view shows per­fect pro­por­tions to the sculp­ture.

The nest shows Howard's attention to detail.

The nest shows Howard’s atten­tion to detail.

What intrigued me, beyond the beau­ty and grace of these bird­hous­es, were the per­fect­ly round open­ings. How did Howard cre­ate them with­out leav­ing that lit­tle hole in the wood that comes with a Forstner bit? Howard advised that he mod­i­fied his Forstner. First he went to his bench grinder to remove the point, and then he con­tin­ued to low­er the point until it was flush, using the two stone bits pic­tured. Good think­ing, Howard!

Modified Forstner Bits - Before and After

Mod­i­fied Forstner Bits — Before and After

High Speed Carver & Stones Used on Forstner Bits

High Speed Carv­er & Stones Used on Forstner Bits

You can view more of Howard’s carv­ings by vis­it­ing his web­site: www.AandAcrafts.com.

***

A quick reminder:

 2015 Inter­na­tion­al Wood­carvers Con­gress
Sec­ond full week in June
Jack­son Coun­ty Fair­grounds
1212 E Quar­ry Street
Maquoke­ta, IA 52060
www.awcltd.org
Ques­tions: Lar­ry Yud­is: 563.676.8264
Car­ol Yud­is: 563.505.2700

The 2015 Inter­na­tion­al Wood­carvers Con­gress is a week-long cel­e­bra­tion of the wood­carv­ing arts. Activ­i­ties dur­ing Con­gress Week include:

  • Carv­ing Com­pe­ti­tion in over 85 sep­a­rate cat­e­gories
  • Open to the pub­lic wood­carv­ing show – Thurs­day through Sun­day
  • Edu­ca­tion­al sem­i­nars (5-day, 3-day, 2-day and 1-day class­es avail­able) that cov­er a vari­ety of carv­ing and relat­ed sub­jects, as well as sem­i­nars for the non-carv­er
  • Silent Auc­tion – Sun­day after­noon
  • Mas­sage Ther­a­pist avail­able through­out the week
  • Annu­al Awards Ban­quet on Sat­ur­day evening
  • Two-Hour Judges’ Cri­tique Ses­sion – Sat­ur­day and Sun­day after­noons
  • Annu­al AWC Mem­ber­ship meet­ing

Hope to see you there!

 ***

E-MAILS

Sub­ject: Carv­ing all 44 Pres­i­dents

I received the fol­low­ing email and pho­tos from Ron Karo, New York. Ron isn’t a carv­er, but he knows great carv­ings when he sees them. While trav­el­ing through Ten­nessee, he came upon two of Gene Webb’s Pres­i­den­tial bust carv­ings and knew he had to have 42 more. I couldn’t share all the pho­tos Ron sent me, but if you click on the Gene Webb’s School of Wood­carv­ing link that should be locat­ed bot­tom right of this col­umn, you can see all of 44 of the pres­i­dents.

Here is Ron’s email. 

Basi­cal­ly, I’ve nev­er met Gene. We hap­pened upon his work while dri­ving through the moun­tains on our way to Dal­las.

There we found [and pur­chased] the two orig­i­nal pres­i­den­tial carv­ings of Oba­ma and Bush Jr… Upon our return to upstate NY, we con­tact­ed Gene about carv­ing all the pres­i­dents. He agreed. Over the next two years we exchanged pho­tos, car­toons, sculp­tures and his­tor­i­cal images culled from the web and books. We used these to design the busts.  Now all are done…all 44…….one is bet­ter than the next. They are tru­ly ter­rif­ic. He [Gene] is the best carv­er alive.

Ron Karo

Gene Webb Pres 2

***

Ever pick up a piece of drift wood at the water’s edge? Bet it wasn’t as large as the drift wood John Car­riere, from Aus­tralia, found on the beach dur­ing a lunchtime stroll. John’s drift­wood weighed in at over 90 lbs. Next month, I’ll share how John got the wood home (a jog­ger helped), how he treat­ed the piece and what he ulti­mate­ly decid­ed to carve.

Carvers help­ing carvers … all the way from Aus­tralia. Does it get any bet­ter than here at WOM? Real­ly??

Until then, gen­tle read­er, may your wood be plen­ti­ful and your tools stay sharp. Take care, carve lots, and always remem­ber to smile.

Peace,
Susan.

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Susan Alexander’s “Let’s Talk Carving” Issue 6

Susan bio shot   Gene Webb’s Indi­an Mask

Please refer to and fol­low all man­u­fac­tur­ers’ direc­tions.

I spent six glo­ri­ous days with Wood­carv­ing Illustrated’s 2014 Wood­carv­er of the Year, Rick Jensen. He taught two back-to-back, three-day bark carv­ing sem­i­nars. Rick’s projects includ­ed carv­ing a bark house with a spi­ral stair­case, and a San­ta with jin­gle bells on a leather belt.

Rick held his sem­i­nars at Gene Webb’s School of Wood­carv­ing locat­ed in the Smoky Moun­tains in Townsend, Ten­nessee. Rick plans to return to Gene’s stu­dio April 1 thru 6, 2016. As in 2015, both pow­er and edged tools will be used. The 2016 sem­i­nar has a max­i­mum of 10 stu­dents. 9 carvers have already giv­en Rick a $100 deposit to hold their space. If you are inter­est­ed, call Rick at 218–281-5107 for the project’s details.

Rick Jensen, Susan Alexander, Gene Webb in Townsend, TN

Rick Jensen, Susan Alexan­der, Gene Webb in Townsend, TN

As luck would have it (mine, not his), Gene Webb’s per­ma­nent carv­ing sta­tion was locat­ed next to mine, which allowed me to observe him pow­er carve an Amer­i­can Indi­an mask. I’m cer­tain I must have annoyed Gene with a series of ques­tions about pow­er carv­ing. How­ev­er, Gene, who has carved for over 40 years, won numer­ous Blue Rib­bon, Best of Show and People’s Choice Awards, was a true Ten­nessee artist, instruc­tor and gen­tle­man. He kind­ly answered each of my ques­tions with grace and patience.

Mask Front-Gene Webb

Mask Front-Gene Webb

Gene carved his mask in spald­ed maple wood using an NSK and Fore­dom. He took the time to explain which bits he chose to use, and the thought process behind his choic­es. I was fas­ci­nat­ed because I sel­dom have had any luck with pow­er carv­ing.

Gene carved the front of the mask before hol­low­ing out the back, leav­ing some del­i­cate por­tions only ¼” thick – so thin you could see light if you held it up to a lamp.

Mask Back - Gene Webb

Mask Back — Gene Webb

After Gene hol­lowed the back of the mask and carved in a hang­er, he buffed the entire carv­ing, front and back, with dif­fer­ent fab­ric-backed grits of sand­pa­per he mount­ed on a man­drel and loaded onto a Fore­dom. Gene then took a wood burn­er to the mask. I asked him to take a pho­to for us when it was ½ burned, so you could see the remark­able dif­fer­ence burn­ing made to the carv­ing.

Half Burned Mask-Gene Webb

After wood burn­ing, Gene applied a fin­ish, which dark­ened the wood dra­mat­i­cal­ly.

Completed Mask -Gene Webb

The final carv­ing was 15” tall by 6” wide.

I was so enthralled with the entire process that I pur­chased Gene’s DVDPow­er Carv­ing an Indi­an Mask, watched it that evening in my room (after carv­ing for 9 hours with Rick), and the next day went back and pur­chased Gene’s Pow­er Carv­ing a Tree Spir­it DVD. Gene has 19 DVD’s at $22.95 each. Even though I prob­a­bly will nev­er carve a mask, I’ll refer to Gene’s DVD when I attempt to pow­er carv­ing an Indi­an face.

There are numer­ous things I like about Gene Webb’s DVDs. While they are pro­fes­sion­al­ly pro­duced, they don’t feel staged. Like many things that are done cor­rect­ly – you don’t notice that the sound, cam­era angles and light­ing were well thought out. Gene has an easy way of explain­ing the art of carv­ing. His friend­ly man­ner and expla­na­tions of bits, carv­ing tools and carv­ing meth­ods belies his numer­ous awards and 40 years of carv­ing expe­ri­ence. When I watch Gene’s DVDs, I feel like I’m get­ting great advice from a carv­ing friend and neigh­bor.

I told Gene I want­ed to tell you, the WOM read­er, how much I enjoyed his DVDs and he said that should any of you decide to pur­chase one of them, if you men­tion my name, you can email him a pho­to of your carv­ing and he’ll cri­tique it at no charge. I know I’ll be tak­ing advan­tage of that offer.

When you have a moment, check out Gene Webb’s web­site at  www.GeneWebbCarvings.com. You’ll find a lot of inter­est­ing carv­ing items on Gene’s site, includ­ing bits, books and tools. If you are ever in the area, or would like to take a trip to the Smoky Moun­tains, Gene offers indi­vid­u­al­ized carv­ing instruc­tions for $150/day or $200/2-day class. Depend­ing upon the sub­ject mat­ter, he also offers week-long class­es. While Gene is flex­i­ble, depend­ing upon his sched­ule, pow­er carv­ing, edged tool class­es (or a mix­ture of both) are usu­ally held the first week of the month.

My trip to Townsend, Ten­nessee has reaped WOM read­ers an addi­tion­al ben­e­fit. Gene has agreed that if a WOM read­er has a carv­ing ques­tion, you may call him at 865–660-1110. Men­tion my name, and Gene will get back to you as soon as he is free. Carvers help­ing carvers!

Fol­low­ing my sem­i­nars with Rick Jensen, I adven­tur­ous­ly signed up for Gene’s 2-day pri­vate chain saw class. I hope to rough out two projects — one per day — an Amer­i­can Indi­an and a wood spir­it — both from a slab of cedar log. I don’t know whether you should send your good luck wish­es to me or Gene. I’ve nev­er picked up a chain saw before. Best send them to Gene.

Here are a few pho­tos of past masks Gene has carved. Vis­it his web­site to see more of his carv­ings.

Cedar Mask -Gene Webb

Cedar Mask -Gene Webb

Bison Masks -Gene Webb

Bison Masks -Gene Webb

Indian Masks -Gene Webb

Indi­an Masks -Gene Webb

***

E-MAILS

Sub­ject: Pray­ing Hands – In-The-Round Carv­ing

I received an email from John Mitchell. He’d like to carve an in-the-round carv­ing of pray­ing hands, and is ask­ing if any­one can pro­vide him with plans. If we couldn’t pro­vide him with plans, John said he saw an arti­cle in a mag­a­zine that gave full instruc­tions for carv­ing pray­ing hands, but can’t recall the issue or name of the mag­a­zine. Can any read­er point John in the right direc­tion? Use the form below to email me, or send the infor­ma­tion to SusanAlexanderCarves@comcast.net and I’ll for­ward it to John as well as print it in my next Let’s Talk Carv­ing col­umn.

***

Sub­ject: A Dif­fer­ent Per­spec­tive

Last month, Shorty Short’s (from Shorty’s Wood Shop) sent us a TIP that sug­gest­ed when we look at a carv­ing we turn off the lights from time to time and have one small light off to the side when exam­in­ing our carv­ing, I received an email from Joe But­ler remind­ing us that look­ing at our carv­ing in a mir­ror will give us an entire­ly new per­spec­tive that will allow us to see what parts of our carv­ing are out of synch. Thanks, Joe. It was good hear­ing from you.

Let me add that when you view your carv­ing in the mir­ror, have a pen­cil with you. While look­ing in the mir­ror, put your fin­ger on the spot that needs adjust­ing. When you turn the carv­ing back to face you, mark that spot with your pen­cil. That way, even if you put your carv­ing down for a day or two, you’ll know exact­ly what needs to be adjust­ed once you begin carv­ing again.

***

Sub­ject: Win­dow Fans and Fur­nace Fil­ters

Last month, I shared Jan Oegema’s email with you regard­ing attach­ing fur­nace fil­ters to a box fan. First of all, my sin­cere apolo­gies to Jan because I spelled his last name incor­rectly. While I kept a few of his vow­els and con­so­nants, Jan’s last name is def­i­nitely not Omega. It must have been a Freudi­an slip because I have recent­ly begun to study the Greek lan­guage, which, of course, includes the let­ter Omega. Sor­ry about that, Jan.

Not only did Jan accept my apolo­gies, being a great carv­er, he sent me a few more pho­tographs and TIPS to share with you. In this pho­to you’ll rec­og­nize the fil­tered box fan that Jan referred to last month. It is inter­est­ing to see how Jan secured it to the ceil­ing.

Jan's Filtered Box Fan Ceiling Height

Jan’s Fil­tered Box Fan Ceil­ing Height

I’ll let Jan tell you, in his own words, about the sec­ond batch of pho­tos he sent us. When I first received them, I thought the pho­to below was of a small vac­u­um sweep­er so I emailed Jan for an expla­na­tion.

Jan's Floor Polisher

Jan’s Floor Pol­ish­er

Here is Jan’s response.

The pic­tures show a floor pol­ish­er NOT a vac­u­um. I con­vert­ed the floor pol­ish­er into a sharp­en­er.

I take the whole pol­ish­er apart and build a case around the motor. Then I take the brush­es out of the round hold­ers and screw a piece of wood on there (as seen in the pic­tures). Glue a piece of leather on the wood (suede side up). From the han­dle I use the switch and the cord and use a used Kitchen draw­er han­dle so I can take it with me on tour. Often I make a sec­ond round set with 200 grit sand­pa­per.

Parts of Floor Polisher

Parts of Floor Pol­ish­er

Jan's Reinvented Tool Sharpener

Jan’s Rein­vent­ed Tool Sharp­en­er

Jan's Reinvented Tool Sharpener

Jan’s Rein­vent­ed Tool Sharp­en­er

I wish I was hand­i­er, but it was cer­tain­ly inter­est­ing see­ing what Jan can do with a floor pol­ish­er!

My Warn­ing to WOM Read­ers: Only if you are very famil­iar and schooled and con­fi­dent in your mechan­i­cal and elec­tri­cal abil­i­ties and the type of equip­ment Jan has tak­en apart and put back togeth­er, should you even con­sider attempt­ing what Jan has accom­plished. You know who you are. I know I couldn’t morph a floor pol­isher into a sharp­ener with­out injur­ing myself or set­ting fire to my stu­dio.

***

Until next time, gen­tle read­er, may your wood be plen­ti­ful and your tools stay sharp. Take care, carve lots, and always remem­ber to smile.

Peace,
Susan.

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CCA 2014 National Caricature Carving Competition

BOS-Award-smEach year in August the Car­i­ca­ture Carvers of Amer­i­ca spon­sor the Nation­al Car­i­ca­ture Carv­ing Com­pe­ti­tion,  Judg­ing takes place at the home of the East­ern Wood­land Carvers Club in Con­verse IN. We are pleased to once again present a pho­to gallery of the 2014 win­ners.  As always, pho­to gal­leries in WOM include large scale pho­tos of the win­ners so that you can get a close-up view of the work.

To view the 2014 win­ners click HERE or click the WOM menu item to go the the Gal­leries page.

The 2015 Nation­al Com­pe­ti­tion will occur in Con­verse on August 20, 2015.  Cash prizes are giv­en to the three Best of Show win­ners, as well as first and sec­ond place in each group.   To down­load the com­pe­ti­tion brochure and the appli­ca­tion form, click HERE.

IWC 2014 Winner Galleries

2014 International Woodcarvers Congress. Award winning carvings.

Cross Hob­bled”, John C Sharp’s Best of Show Win­ner in AWC 2014

Assem­bling the pho­to gallery for the Inter­na­tion­al Wood­carv­er Con­gress Win­ners is a mix of labor and won­der;  it is, quite frankly, the great­est amount of work of any sin­gle arti­cle in WOM, and yet I know I’m going to see a lot of won­der­ful carv­ings as I edit the gal­leries.  The 2014 IWC Gallery was no excep­tion, start­ing with John C. Sharpe’s Best of Show win­ner.   This edi­tion has some 296 pho­tos (twice that num­ber if you count the thumb­nails) includ­ing some of the best carv­ings you will see any­where.  In the win­ner gal­leries you’ll find 169 of pho­tog­ra­ph­er Marc Feath­er­ly’s excel­lent stu­dio pho­tos of the win­ners at IWC 2014, includ­ing more pho­tos of the Best of Show win­ner.

In addi­tion to the gallery of the prize-win­ning carv­ings, you’ll also find Marc’s can­did pho­tos from the Class­es, Award Ban­quet, the Judges cri­tique ses­sion, the Show floor, and oth­er pho­tos around and about dur­ing Con­gress.

As always, the pho­tos in the winner’s gallery are click­able, and will take you to much larg­er ver­sions of these great carv­ings.  (Much larg­er then you’ll see in any paper pub­li­ca­tion.)  The large pho­tos will afford you the oppor­tu­ni­ty to real­ly look at the win­ners in detail.

To vis­it the gal­leries, in the menu bar above click on WOM, then on The Gal­leries menu item, or click HERE.   Enjoy!