Archive for WOM – Page 2

July-August 2016 WOM

 Vol20Issue4Banner

Welcome to Woodcarver Online Magazine Volume 20 Issue 4

2015 Artistry in Wood, Dayton carving show. Competition winners.

Detail — Air O’Smith 

Ter­ry Brash­er, Peters­burg, TN

Best of Show, Artistry In Wood 2015

Hel­lo, Friends in Carv­ing -

Wel­come to the forth issue in the 20th year of Wood­carv­er Online Mag­a­zine.

The main fea­tures in this issue are the show report and pho­to gallery for Artistry in Wood 2015.  There were some won­der­ful carv­ings in that edi­tion of AIW and I’m sure you will enjoy the pho­tos tak­en by Marc Father­ly.

Reminder:  AIW will have a date and loca­tion change in 2016.  For more infor­ma­tion see the show report in this issue or click the link on the AIW entry on the Events, Hap­pen­ings and Goings-On page

In this issue:

  • AIW 2015 Show Report
  • Pho­to Gallery - AIW 2015 Win­ners
  • Pho­to Gallery — AIW 2015 Casu­al Pho­tos and Guest Artist Vic Hood
  • Ol’ Don’s Draw­ing Table: Burg­er Bon Vivant
  • Pete LeClair: Mr Scraps
  • Update to Events, Hap­pen­ings and Goings-On

As always, we wel­come your feed­back, ideas for arti­cles, etc.  Please use the con­tact form on the About page in the menu bar above.

Enjoy!

Matt-IWC14

Pho­to by Marc Feath­er­ly at IWC ’14

Matt Kel­ley

Editor/Owner

May-June 2016 WOM

Vol20Issue3Banner

Welcome to Woodcarver Online Magazine Volume 20 Issue 3

 

Zuziak6355

Detail — Cof­fee Table

Scott Zuzi­ak, Lazy Riv­er Stu­dio

Hel­lo, Friends in Carv­ing -

Wel­come to the third issue in the 20th year of Wood­carv­er Online Mag­a­zine.  We have a nice assort­ment of arti­cles for you this issue.

Reminder:  For those of you who attend the Day­ton Carvers Artistry In Wood event, if you haven’t heard, AIW will have a date and loca­tion change in 2016.  For more infor­ma­tion click the link on the AIW entry on the Events, Hap­pen­ings and Goings-On page

Don’t for­get the 50th Annu­al Inter­na­tion­al Wood­carvers Con­gress in June.  Entries for the com­pe­ti­tion may be mailed in or car­ried in.  There are still some class­es avail­able.  Click the IWC ban­ner to the right for more infor­ma­tion.

In this issue:

  • 50 Years of Carv­ings — New Eng­land Wood Carvers
  • Pho­to Gallery - Scott Zuzi­ak Com­mis­sion Cof­fee Table
  • Ol’ Don’s Draw­ing Table: Fun In The Sun
  • Pete LeClair: Chuck­ie
  •  Sell­ing Fin­ished Work by Lora S. Irish
  • Cougar, Deer and Griz­zly Pat­terns by Lora S. Irish
  • Update to Events, Hap­pen­ings and Goings-On

As always, we wel­come your feed­back, ideas for arti­cles, etc.  Please use the con­tact form on the About page in the menu bar above.

Enjoy!

Matt-IWC14

Pho­to by Marc Feath­er­ly at IWC ’14

Matt Kel­ley

Editor/Owner

March/April 2016 WOM

Vol20Issue2

Welcome to Woodcarver Online Magazine Volume 20 Issue 2

Butlin-James

Lazy Day

James But­lin, Hilton, NY

2015 CCA Nation­al Car­i­ca­ture Carv­ing Com­pe­ti­tion, Sin­gle Ani­mal

Hel­lo, Friends in Carv­ing -

Wel­come to the sec­ond issue in the 20th year of Wood­carv­er Online Mag­a­zine.  This issue includes our annu­al pho­to gallery of the CCA 2015 Car­i­ca­ture Carv­ing Com­pe­ti­tion win­ners.

For those of you who attend the Day­ton Carvers Artistry In Wood event, if you haven’t heard, AIW will have a date and loca­tion change in 2016.  For more infor­ma­tion click the link on the AIW entry on the Events, Hap­pen­ings and Goings-On page

While mak­ing plans for the spring, don’t for­get the 50th Annu­al Inter­na­tion­al Wood­carvers Con­gress in June.  Entries for the com­pe­ti­tion may be mailed in or car­ried in.  There are still class­es avail­able, but some fill ear­ly.  Click the IWC ban­ner to the right for more infor­ma­tion.

In this issue:

  • Pho­to Gallery - Car­i­ca­ture Carvers of Amer­i­ca 2015 Nation­al Car­i­ca­ture Carv­ing Com­pe­ti­tion Win­ners
  • Ol’ Don’s Draw­ing Table: Fries With That?
  • Pete LeClair: Cliffy
  •  Tools Sets  for Begin­ning Carvers by Susan Irish
  • Major Update to Events, Hap­pen­ings and Goings-On
  • Call For Pho­tos for future Celtic Art issue of WOM

As always, we wel­come your feed­back, ideas for arti­cles, etc.  Please use the con­tact form on the About page in the menu bar above.

Enjoy!

Matt-IWC14

Pho­to by Marc Feath­er­ly at IWC ’14

Matt Kel­ley

Editor/Owner

January/February 2016 WOM

Vol20Issue1Banner

Welcome to Woodcarver Online Magazine Volume 20 Issue 1

Library-7117

Carv­ing in Cana­da Library of Par­lia­ment

Pho­to By Don But­ler

Hel­lo, Friends in Carv­ing -

  • Wel­come to the start of the 20th year of Wood­carv­er Online Mag­a­zine.  We are going to be cel­e­brat­ing through­out the year, and while some ideas are in the works, we are always open to sug­ges­tions for ways to cel­e­brate this mile­stone.  Feel free to use the con­tact form on the About page, or email me at womed­i­tor AT com­cast DOT net.
  • Don But­ler dis­cov­ered a trea­sure trove of won­der­ful carv­ings in the Cana­da Library of Par­lia­ment and the gallery with some 45 of his pho­tos is well worth spend­ing some time vis­it­ing.

In this issue:

  • Pho­to Gallery - Carv­ings In The Cana­da Library of Par­lia­ment
  • Ol’ Don’s Draw­ing Table: Her Majesty’s Finest
  • Pete LeClair: Cousin Per­cy
  •  Notes From The Net
  • Events, Hap­pen­ings and Goings-On Updat­ed

 

As always, we wel­come your feed­back, ideas for arti­cles, etc.  Please use the con­tact form on the About page in the menu bar above.

Enjoy!

Matt-IWC14

Pho­to by Marc Feath­er­ly at IWC ’14

Matt Kel­ley

Editor/Owner

November/December 2015 WOM

Vol19Issue6Banner

Welcome to Woodcarver Online Magazine Volume 19 Issue 6

2015 Inter­na­tion­al Wood­carvers Con­gress

Group B, Relief Carv­ing

1st in Class 206 — Mythical/Santa Relief 

Father Christ­mas 

Nan­cy L. Olson, Altoona , WI

17 x 13 x 3

Hel­lo, Friends in Carv­ing -

Wel­come to the final issue of WOM for 2015.  This issue will wrap up 19 years of pub­li­ca­tion and we’ll start our 20th year with the January/February 2016 issue.  Twen­ty Years is a big deal, so we are going to be cel­e­brat­ing through­out the year.  Lots of ideas rat­tling around in the ol’ brain pan, but we are always open to sug­gests for way to cel­e­brate this mile­stone.  Feel free to use the con­tact form on the About page, or email me at womed­i­tor AT com­cast DOT net.

It was my intent to pub­lish the IWC 2015 Win­ners gallery in the Octo­ber por­tion of the September/October issue;  how­ev­er, com­put­er soft­ware update issues put my desk­top machine on the side­lines for a week or so.   Direct­ly that was resolved, a seri­ous­ly ill West High­land White Ter­ri­er (that allows us to share “his” domain) occu­pied a lot of our time, ener­gy and resources (read $$).   I’m hap­py to report that the West­ie, name of Jack, is recov­er­ing nice­ly, and we are final­ly back on track with time to work on this pub­li­ca­tion and even carve a bit.

Speak­ing of the IWC Win­ners — there were some extra­or­di­nary carv­ings in the com­pe­ti­tion this year.  I’m glad that I didn’t have to choose between the three Best of Show carv­ings.  Rick Harney’s Spunk is as fine a relief carv­ing as you’ll ever see.  (It was a good year for Rick; he took first, sec­ond and third in the Relief Carv­ing group.)    David Seagraves’s Artemis is a life-size carv­ing of the Hel­lenic god­dess of the hunt, wild ani­mals and the wilder­ness.  Air O’Smith, by Ter­ry Brash­er, is a car­i­ca­ture carv­ing that can’t help but make you smile.  Make sure you check out these and all the oth­er win­ners in the IWC ’15 Gal­leries.  Don’t for­get that all of the small images are click­able links that will take you to a much larg­er view of the carv­ing, with far more detail than any print mag­a­zine.

In this issue:

  • Pho­to Gallery - Inter­na­tion­al Wood­carv­er Con­gress 2015 Win­ners
  • Ol’ Don’s Draw­ing Table: Red or White
  • Pete LeClair: Carv­ing On The Cor­ner
  • Last Call For Pho­tos — San­ta Gallery 2015
  • An Update — Susan Alexander’s Let’s Talk Carv­ing
  • Events, Hap­pen­ings and Goings-On Updat­ed

Com­ing up around the First of Decem­ber:

  • The San­ta Gallery
  • Book ReviewCon­cepts To Car­i­ca­tures — Cel­e­brat­ing 25 Years of Car­i­ca­ture Carv­ing
  • Notes From The Net

As always, we wel­come your feed­back, ideas for arti­cles, etc.  Please use the con­tact form on the About page in the menu bar above.

Enjoy!

Matt-IWC14

Pho­to by Marc Feath­er­ly at IWC ’14

Matt Kel­ley

Editor/Owner

September/October 2015 WOM

 Vol19Issue5Banner

Welcome to Woodcarver Online Magazine Volume 19 Issue 5

2015 Inter­na­tion­al Wood­carvers Con­gress

3rd In Group — Minia­ture — (Max Size 3″ x 3″ x 3″ Cube), 2nd In Class 1o01 — Animal/s

Play Time

2′ x 2″ x 2″

Lila Gilmer, Simp­sonville SC

Hel­lo, Friends in Carv­ing -

We are pleased to wel­come Helvie Knives as the newest spon­sor of Wood­carv­er Online Mag­a­zine and CarversCompanion.com.   Helvie Knives offers a vari­ety of high qual­i­ty hand-make knives, includ­ing the Sig­na­ture Col­lec­tion and cus­tom blades and han­dles.   Click on the graph­ic in the Spon­sor side­bar to vis­it the Helvie web­site.

In this issue:

  • Susan Alexander’s Let’s Talk Carv­ing #11
  • Ol’ Don’s Draw­ing Table: Tree­top
  • Pete LeClair: Hamil­ton
  • Call For Pho­tos — San­ta Gallery 2015

Com­ing up in Octo­ber:

  • Pho­to Gallery - Inter­na­tion­al Wood­carv­er Con­gress 2015 Win­ners
  • Events, Hap­pen­ings and Goings-On Updat­ed
  • Notes From The Net
  • Susan Alexander’s Let’s Talk Carv­ing #12
  • Book Reviews

As always, we wel­come your feed­back, ideas for arti­cles, etc.  Please use the con­tact form on the About page in the menu bar above.

Enjoy!

Matt-IWC14

Pho­to by Marc Feath­er­ly at IWC ’14

Matt Kel­ley

Editor/Owner

July/August 2015 WOM

Welcome to Woodcarver Online Magazine Volume 19 Issue 3

2014 Artistry in Wood — Day­ton Carvers Guild

2014 Artistry in Wood, Award winning carvings.

2014 Artistry in Wood, Best in Group K

1st Place — Group K

Kan­ga­roo and Joey

Diane Har­to, Man­tua, OH

Hel­lo, Friends in Carv­ing -

We are pleased to wel­come Gene Webb Enter­pris­es as the newest spon­sor of Wood­carv­er Online Mag­a­zine and CarversCompanion.com.   Gene offers instruc­tion and videos, sup­plies, tools and mate­ri­als, as well as fin­ished carv­ings.   Gene is run­ning a spe­cial right now for WOM/CarversCompanion.com read­ers:  20% dis­count on any orders $75.00 and over untill the end of May. Use the coupon code online or for phone-in orders. Coupon code is SAVEBIG.   Click on the graph­ic in the Spon­sor side­bar to vis­it his web­site.

In this issue:

  • Artistry In Wood 2014 Show Report and Win­ners Pho­to Gallery
  • Susan Alexander’s Let’s Talk Carv­ing #9
  • Steve Kulp’s Small Carv­ing Hold­er
  • Ol’ Don’s Draw­ing Table: Surf Seek­er
  • Pete LeClair: Stub­by
  • Events, Hap­pen­ings and Goings-On Updat­ed

Com­ing up in Part II, in August:

  • Susan Alexander’s Let’s Talk Carv­ing #10
  • Book Reviews!
  • Notes From The Net Updat­ed

As always, we wel­come your feed­back, ideas for arti­cles, etc.  Please use the con­tact form on the About page in the menu bar above.

Enjoy!

 

Matt-IWC14

Pho­to by Marc Feath­er­ly at IWC ’14

Matt Kel­ley

Editor/Owner

May/June 2015 WOM

Welcome to Woodcarver Online Magazine Volume 19 Issue 3

Lynn-Doughty-Best-of-M

2014 Artistry in Wood — Day­ton Carvers Guild

1st Place — Car­i­ca­ture

Topped Out

Lynn Doughty, Jay, OK

Hel­lo, Friends in Carv­ing -

We are pleased to wel­come Gene Webb Enter­pris­es as the newest spon­sor of Wood­carv­er Online Mag­a­zine and CarversCompanion.com.   Gene offers instruc­tion and videos, sup­plies, tools and mate­ri­als, as well as fin­ished carv­ings.   Gene is run­ning a spe­cial right now for WOM/CarversCompanion.com read­ers:  20% dis­count on any orders $75.00 and over untill the end of May. Use the coupon code online or for phone-in orders. Coupon code is SAVEBIG.   Click on the graph­ic in the Spon­sor side­bar to vis­it his web­site.

In this issue:

  • Will Hay­den Carved Name Tag Project Gallery
  • Susan Alexander’s Let’s Talk Carv­ing #7
  • Ol’ Don’s Draw­ing Table: The Office Gos­sip
  • Pete LeClair: Doyle

Com­ing up soon:

  • Pho­to GalleryArtistry In Wood ’14 Win­ners
  • Events, Hap­pen­ings and Goings-On Updat­ed
  • Notes From The Net

Com­ing up in June:

  • Susan Alexander’s Let’s Talk Carv­ing #8

As always, we wel­come your feed­back, ideas for arti­cles, etc.  Please use the con­tact form on the About page in the menu bar above.

Enjoy!

 

Matt-IWC14

Pho­to by Marc Feath­er­ly at IWC ’14

Matt Kel­ley

Editor/Owner

Susan Alexander’s “Let’s Talk Carving” Issue 7

Susan bio shot        Burs for Beginner Power Carvers

Please refer to and fol­low all man­u­fac­tur­ers’ direc­tions.

Please join me in wel­com­ing Wood­carvers On-Line Magazine’s newest spon­sor, Gene Webb’s School of Wood­carv­ing locat­ed in the Smoky Moun­tains in Townsend, Ten­nessee. Just go to the right and click on his link and you will be tak­en direct­ly to Gene’s wood­carv­ing shop where you’ll find tools, carv­ings, DVDs, bits and burs. Or, you can speak to Gene Webb at: 865–660‑1110.

If you ever saw my stu­dio, you would know my heart is firm­ly enmeshed in edged tools. I own micro tools, palm tools, Euro­pean sized and mal­let tools, and dozens of knives of all shapes and sizes – from ½” blades to hog­ging knives. I unabashed­ly love tools. I see, in each one of them, the raw met­al that came from the earth. I can imag­ine how it was fired, ham­mered and sharp­ened. And then the tool came to live with me…forever and ever.

So, the ques­tion I have been ask­ing myself this last year is, “Why am I carv­ing less often?”

I real­ized that the answer is, “Because my hands hurt A LOT the next day.”

Bot­tom line: Yes. I have seen the doc. Can’t do much about it. I have arthri­tis. It’s not rheuma­toid. Got some meds. Tried mis­cel­la­neous home reme­dies, all of which do some good.

Will it stop me from carv­ing? No. But, is it slow­ing me down? Yes. DANG IT!!

A while back, I pur­chased a Fore­dom and then a RAM think­ing I could use pow­er in lieu of edged tools, at least for rough­ing out a carv­ing. I found pow­er just didn’t work for me. The burs bounced and stuck and jumped and skid­ded across the carv­ing. I didn’t want to give up. I tried dif­fer­ent types of burs, then dif­fer­ent sized burs, and final­ly dif­fer­ent amounts of pow­er. My carv­ings were so ugly, the only rea­son I kept them was because they were the excel­lent exam­ples of bad pow­er carv­ing.

This was why I took Rick Jensen’s pow­er carv­ing class last month. I was cer­tain that six days of pow­er carv­ing under Rick’s tute­lage had to point me in the right direc­tion. And, boy, was I right! Plus, I can report that I expe­ri­enced only a min­i­mum amount of pain in the days that fol­lowed. Best of all, in addi­tion to pow­er carv­ing, I still used my first love — edged tools — just not as often.

Tak­ing Rick’s class was a bless­ing. Sit­ting next to Gene Webb made it a dou­ble bless­ing. While Rick taught us how to pow­er carve a bark house, stairs, rocks and a San­ta, I was keep­ing my eye on Gene as he pow­er carved wood spir­its and Amer­i­can Indi­ans. I had the oppor­tu­ni­ty to learn from two mas­ter carvers.

The week I returned home, I thought about this col­umn and that many of you may want to con­sid­er pow­er carv­ing for the same rea­son I was pur­su­ing it. Six days of pow­er carv­ing in Ten­nessee helped me nail the basic tech­nique, but I cer­tain­ly am not expe­ri­enced enough to advise you what bits or burs to start with. So, I called Gene Webb and asked his advice.

My ques­tion to Gene was, “What burs would you rec­om­mend to a WOM read­er who wants to try pow­er carv­ing.” Gene, of course, sur­passed what I expect­ed. He pro­vid­ed us not only with which burs to begin with, but carved two wood spir­its and took a pro­gres­sion of pho­tos to help us under­stand each bur’s use.

Here is Gene’s reply:

I think four burs would be best.

 Gene Webb Burrs 1

These four burs com­plet­ed the two carv­ings I am about to show you. These burs will also work on bass­wood, and walk­ing sticks.


Gene Webb burrs 3
#1 is a Sabur­tooth, yel­low flame. 1/8th” shaft. I use it for rough­ing out small spir­its, Indi­an, etc.  

Gene Webb Burrs 4

#2 is a super coarse ruby. I used it to smooth them up.  3/32 shaft.


Gene Webb Burrs 5

#3 is a dou­ble cut car­bide dove­tail. 1/8″ shaft. I used it on the hair.

 #4 is a 1/16′ Sphere Dou­ble cut car­bide ball. 1/8″ shaft. I used it for the mouth, nose and eye holes.


Gene Webb Burrs 2


Gene Webb Burrs 6

These are small carv­ings. One is cot­ton wood bark, the oth­er is cedar.

These small spir­it carv­ings are signed and dat­ed. They retail for $30.00 and are approx­i­mate­ly 2’‘ wide and 6’’ long.

FYI: I already pur­chased Gene’s cedar wood spir­it. The cot­ton wood bark spir­it may still be avail­able.

If you think you may want to jump into pow­er carv­ing, like I did, Gene has put togeth­er a carv­ing bur kit that has every­thing need­ed to do most small projects. The kit is list­ed on his web­site for $105.95 (about a $15 sav­ings, which is the cost of a bur). The kit includes a sander that Gene uses on his carv­ings, and of course, you can call Gene at 865–660‑1110 when you need advice or get stuck, and he will get back to you as soon as he is free.

And, once more, I want to thank Gene Webb’s School of Wood­carv­ing for spon­sor­ing Wood­carvers Online Mag­a­zine. Carvers help­ing carvers!!


Chain Saw Carving

Oh … almost for­got.

The two-day chain saw carv­ing sem­i­nar I took from Gene was awe­some! I roughed out a cedar wood spir­it and an Amer­i­can Indi­an.

I admit to wound­ing the chair, but it sur­vived. I came back with a lot of knowl­edge and all my appendages intact. It was great!

***

E-Mails

Sub­ject: Pray­ing Hands – In-The-Round Carv­ing

Last month, I received an email from John Mitchell ask­ing about plans or mag­a­zine arti­cles for carv­ing pray­ing hands in-the-round. I received an answer all the way from Aus­tralia, from John Car­riere. Here it is:

Just read your arti­cles in WOM.

I researched my old wood carv­ing mag­a­zines and found three arti­cles that John Mitchell might like to look up. All are in the British Wood­carv­ing mag­a­zines.

One of them is in the July/August 2001 issue page 22 enti­tled “Skilled Hands” by Pete Ben­son.

Anoth­er is in the September/October 1997 issue, page 37 enti­tled “Give Him a Hand” by Derek Old­bury.

The oth­er one is in the May/June 2001 issue, page 17 enti­tled “Lend­ing a Help­ing Hand” by Michael Painter. 

I hope they can be of assis­tance to him. 

I am work­ing on a large relief carv­ing at the moment. It is a moun­tain­scape about 700mm (2.5 feet) wide by about 900 mm (3 feet) high. It is part of a tree trunk I found on the shore. 

I have been try­ing out a neg­a­tive ion gen­er­a­tor in my studio/workshop. The prin­ci­ple is that neg­a­tive ions gen­er­at­ed from the gen­er­a­tor cling to dust par­ti­cles, mak­ing them heavy enough to fall to the floor, thus clean­ing the air. A spin off is that there is a very pleas­ant smell from the neg­a­tive ions. You might like to look into this as a future tip for wood­carvers. 

All the very best to you Susan,

John

John, thank you so much for tak­ing the time to research your back issues of the British Wood­carv­ing Mag­a­zine. Good luck on your moun­tain­scape. Also, please let us know if the neg­a­tive ion gen­er­a­tor actu­al­ly does help clean the air of dust par­ti­cles. We all would be inter­est­ed in that!

If any of our read­ers now use, or have had any expe­ri­ence using a neg­a­tive ion gen­er­a­tor in their work­shop, please drop me an email using the form below, or at SusanAlexanderCarves@comcast.net, and I’ll share your expe­ri­ence with the rest of the WOM read­ers.

***

Next month, I’ll show you the “Ulti­mate Bird­hous­es” that Howard Atwood carves. They are absolute­ly amaz­ing! Howard was kind enough to allow me to share, with you, how he mod­i­fied a spe­cif­ic tool for his bird­hous­es, with great results. Carvers help­ing carvers!

Until then, gen­tle read­er, may your wood be plen­ti­ful and your tools stay sharp. Take care, carve lots, and always remem­ber to smile.

Peace,
Susan.

Logo

Susan Alexander’s “Let’s Talk Carving” Issue 6

Susan bio shot   Gene Webb’s Indi­an Mask

Please refer to and fol­low all man­u­fac­tur­ers’ direc­tions.

I spent six glo­ri­ous days with Wood­carv­ing Illustrated’s 2014 Wood­carv­er of the Year, Rick Jensen. He taught two back-to-back, three-day bark carv­ing sem­i­nars. Rick’s projects includ­ed carv­ing a bark house with a spi­ral stair­case, and a San­ta with jin­gle bells on a leather belt.

Rick held his sem­i­nars at Gene Webb’s School of Wood­carv­ing locat­ed in the Smoky Moun­tains in Townsend, Ten­nessee. Rick plans to return to Gene’s stu­dio April 1 thru 6, 2016. As in 2015, both pow­er and edged tools will be used. The 2016 sem­i­nar has a max­i­mum of 10 stu­dents. 9 carvers have already giv­en Rick a $100 deposit to hold their space. If you are inter­est­ed, call Rick at 218–281-5107 for the project’s details.

Rick Jensen, Susan Alexander, Gene Webb in Townsend, TN

Rick Jensen, Susan Alexan­der, Gene Webb in Townsend, TN

As luck would have it (mine, not his), Gene Webb’s per­ma­nent carv­ing sta­tion was locat­ed next to mine, which allowed me to observe him pow­er carve an Amer­i­can Indi­an mask. I’m cer­tain I must have annoyed Gene with a series of ques­tions about pow­er carv­ing. How­ev­er, Gene, who has carved for over 40 years, won numer­ous Blue Rib­bon, Best of Show and People’s Choice Awards, was a true Ten­nessee artist, instruc­tor and gen­tle­man. He kind­ly answered each of my ques­tions with grace and patience.

Mask Front-Gene Webb

Mask Front-Gene Webb

Gene carved his mask in spald­ed maple wood using an NSK and Fore­dom. He took the time to explain which bits he chose to use, and the thought process behind his choic­es. I was fas­ci­nat­ed because I sel­dom have had any luck with pow­er carv­ing.

Gene carved the front of the mask before hol­low­ing out the back, leav­ing some del­i­cate por­tions only ¼” thick – so thin you could see light if you held it up to a lamp.

Mask Back - Gene Webb

Mask Back — Gene Webb

After Gene hol­lowed the back of the mask and carved in a hang­er, he buffed the entire carv­ing, front and back, with dif­fer­ent fab­ric-backed grits of sand­pa­per he mount­ed on a man­drel and loaded onto a Fore­dom. Gene then took a wood burn­er to the mask. I asked him to take a pho­to for us when it was ½ burned, so you could see the remark­able dif­fer­ence burn­ing made to the carv­ing.

Half Burned Mask-Gene Webb

After wood burn­ing, Gene applied a fin­ish, which dark­ened the wood dra­mat­i­cal­ly.

Completed Mask -Gene Webb

The final carv­ing was 15” tall by 6” wide.

I was so enthralled with the entire process that I pur­chased Gene’s DVDPow­er Carv­ing an Indi­an Mask, watched it that evening in my room (after carv­ing for 9 hours with Rick), and the next day went back and pur­chased Gene’s Pow­er Carv­ing a Tree Spir­it DVD. Gene has 19 DVD’s at $22.95 each. Even though I prob­a­bly will nev­er carve a mask, I’ll refer to Gene’s DVD when I attempt to pow­er carv­ing an Indi­an face.

There are numer­ous things I like about Gene Webb’s DVDs. While they are pro­fes­sion­al­ly pro­duced, they don’t feel staged. Like many things that are done cor­rect­ly – you don’t notice that the sound, cam­era angles and light­ing were well thought out. Gene has an easy way of explain­ing the art of carv­ing. His friend­ly man­ner and expla­na­tions of bits, carv­ing tools and carv­ing meth­ods belies his numer­ous awards and 40 years of carv­ing expe­ri­ence. When I watch Gene’s DVDs, I feel like I’m get­ting great advice from a carv­ing friend and neigh­bor.

I told Gene I want­ed to tell you, the WOM read­er, how much I enjoyed his DVDs and he said that should any of you decide to pur­chase one of them, if you men­tion my name, you can email him a pho­to of your carv­ing and he’ll cri­tique it at no charge. I know I’ll be tak­ing advan­tage of that offer.

When you have a moment, check out Gene Webb’s web­site at  www.GeneWebbCarvings.com. You’ll find a lot of inter­est­ing carv­ing items on Gene’s site, includ­ing bits, books and tools. If you are ever in the area, or would like to take a trip to the Smoky Moun­tains, Gene offers indi­vid­u­al­ized carv­ing instruc­tions for $150/day or $200/2-day class. Depend­ing upon the sub­ject mat­ter, he also offers week-long class­es. While Gene is flex­i­ble, depend­ing upon his sched­ule, pow­er carv­ing, edged tool class­es (or a mix­ture of both) are usu­ally held the first week of the month.

My trip to Townsend, Ten­nessee has reaped WOM read­ers an addi­tion­al ben­e­fit. Gene has agreed that if a WOM read­er has a carv­ing ques­tion, you may call him at 865–660-1110. Men­tion my name, and Gene will get back to you as soon as he is free. Carvers help­ing carvers!

Fol­low­ing my sem­i­nars with Rick Jensen, I adven­tur­ous­ly signed up for Gene’s 2-day pri­vate chain saw class. I hope to rough out two projects — one per day — an Amer­i­can Indi­an and a wood spir­it — both from a slab of cedar log. I don’t know whether you should send your good luck wish­es to me or Gene. I’ve nev­er picked up a chain saw before. Best send them to Gene.

Here are a few pho­tos of past masks Gene has carved. Vis­it his web­site to see more of his carv­ings.

Cedar Mask -Gene Webb

Cedar Mask -Gene Webb

Bison Masks -Gene Webb

Bison Masks -Gene Webb

Indian Masks -Gene Webb

Indi­an Masks -Gene Webb

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E-MAILS

Sub­ject: Pray­ing Hands – In-The-Round Carv­ing

I received an email from John Mitchell. He’d like to carve an in-the-round carv­ing of pray­ing hands, and is ask­ing if any­one can pro­vide him with plans. If we couldn’t pro­vide him with plans, John said he saw an arti­cle in a mag­a­zine that gave full instruc­tions for carv­ing pray­ing hands, but can’t recall the issue or name of the mag­a­zine. Can any read­er point John in the right direc­tion? Use the form below to email me, or send the infor­ma­tion to SusanAlexanderCarves@comcast.net and I’ll for­ward it to John as well as print it in my next Let’s Talk Carv­ing col­umn.

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Sub­ject: A Dif­fer­ent Per­spec­tive

Last month, Shorty Short’s (from Shorty’s Wood Shop) sent us a TIP that sug­gest­ed when we look at a carv­ing we turn off the lights from time to time and have one small light off to the side when exam­in­ing our carv­ing, I received an email from Joe But­ler remind­ing us that look­ing at our carv­ing in a mir­ror will give us an entire­ly new per­spec­tive that will allow us to see what parts of our carv­ing are out of synch. Thanks, Joe. It was good hear­ing from you.

Let me add that when you view your carv­ing in the mir­ror, have a pen­cil with you. While look­ing in the mir­ror, put your fin­ger on the spot that needs adjust­ing. When you turn the carv­ing back to face you, mark that spot with your pen­cil. That way, even if you put your carv­ing down for a day or two, you’ll know exact­ly what needs to be adjust­ed once you begin carv­ing again.

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Sub­ject: Win­dow Fans and Fur­nace Fil­ters

Last month, I shared Jan Oegema’s email with you regard­ing attach­ing fur­nace fil­ters to a box fan. First of all, my sin­cere apolo­gies to Jan because I spelled his last name incor­rectly. While I kept a few of his vow­els and con­so­nants, Jan’s last name is def­i­nitely not Omega. It must have been a Freudi­an slip because I have recent­ly begun to study the Greek lan­guage, which, of course, includes the let­ter Omega. Sor­ry about that, Jan.

Not only did Jan accept my apolo­gies, being a great carv­er, he sent me a few more pho­tographs and TIPS to share with you. In this pho­to you’ll rec­og­nize the fil­tered box fan that Jan referred to last month. It is inter­est­ing to see how Jan secured it to the ceil­ing.

Jan's Filtered Box Fan Ceiling Height

Jan’s Fil­tered Box Fan Ceil­ing Height

I’ll let Jan tell you, in his own words, about the sec­ond batch of pho­tos he sent us. When I first received them, I thought the pho­to below was of a small vac­u­um sweep­er so I emailed Jan for an expla­na­tion.

Jan's Floor Polisher

Jan’s Floor Pol­ish­er

Here is Jan’s response.

The pic­tures show a floor pol­ish­er NOT a vac­u­um. I con­vert­ed the floor pol­ish­er into a sharp­en­er.

I take the whole pol­ish­er apart and build a case around the motor. Then I take the brush­es out of the round hold­ers and screw a piece of wood on there (as seen in the pic­tures). Glue a piece of leather on the wood (suede side up). From the han­dle I use the switch and the cord and use a used Kitchen draw­er han­dle so I can take it with me on tour. Often I make a sec­ond round set with 200 grit sand­pa­per.

Parts of Floor Polisher

Parts of Floor Pol­ish­er

Jan's Reinvented Tool Sharpener

Jan’s Rein­vent­ed Tool Sharp­en­er

Jan's Reinvented Tool Sharpener

Jan’s Rein­vent­ed Tool Sharp­en­er

I wish I was hand­i­er, but it was cer­tain­ly inter­est­ing see­ing what Jan can do with a floor pol­ish­er!

My Warn­ing to WOM Read­ers: Only if you are very famil­iar and schooled and con­fi­dent in your mechan­i­cal and elec­tri­cal abil­i­ties and the type of equip­ment Jan has tak­en apart and put back togeth­er, should you even con­sider attempt­ing what Jan has accom­plished. You know who you are. I know I couldn’t morph a floor pol­isher into a sharp­ener with­out injur­ing myself or set­ting fire to my stu­dio.

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Until next time, gen­tle read­er, may your wood be plen­ti­ful and your tools stay sharp. Take care, carve lots, and always remem­ber to smile.

Peace,
Susan.

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