Archive for October 2012

September/October 2012 WOM

Vol16Issue5Banner

 

Welcome to Issue 5 of Year 16 of Woodcarver Online Magazine.

Our Front Page photo this issue is:

Lynn Doughty’s

Artistry in Wood 2011 Winner for

Best of Category M – Caricatures

Rise & Shine II

Photo: Marc Featherly

 

LynnDoughty's "Rise and Shine"

LynnDoughty’s “Rise and Shine”

 

Hello carving friends –

This issue of WOM includes a report and photo gallery of the winners at Artistry in Wood 2011. AIW ’12 is only a few short weeks away, and if you have never attended it is well worth the drive.

If you are a Facebook member, take time to visit the Carvers’ Companion/Woodcarver List Facebook group. This provides a place on FB for carvers to post carving photos and to chat about carving; it also serves as a companion to the Woodcarver Listserv. Come on by for a visit! Click HERE or on Facebook search for “Woodcarver List”

In this issue:

Report and Photos GalleryArtistry in Wood 2011

Call for Santa and seasonal carving photos

Part 3 of Finding and Collecting Cottonwood Bark by Alex Bisso

One Tree Project by Dan Blair

It’s going to be one of those days by “Ol’ Don” Biurgdorf

Bonus pattern – The West by “Ol’ Don” Biurgdorf

Pete LeClair’s Jarrel

 

Call For Front Page Carving Photos We’re always looking for great photos of great carvings for the front page of WOM. If you’d like your photo to be considered, send it on in. Please include the back story, material and finish info, size, etc. Send to womeditor AT comcast.net

Articles and suggestions for articles are always welcome. Feel free to send suggestions and request. For information on submitting articles for publication, click HERE.

WOM Editor Matt Kelley

WOM Editor Matt Kelley

 

From Pete LeClair

Pete LeClairPete LeClair’s Jarrel

Pete LeClair’s project this issue features that great swabie: Jerrel

Jarrelmaster

Jerrel

 

Pete LeClair is a well-known carver and teacher, author of three carving books and a member of the Caricature Carvers of America. You may learn more about Pete at his page on the CCA web site. Be sure to tour the rest of the CCA pages when you have a moment. In addition, you may email Pete at peteleclair AT comcast.net. Photos copyright 2001 – 2012 by Pete LeClair.

This pattern may be copied for individual use only; reproduction for resale is prohibited without express written permission.

From “Ol’ Don’s” Drawing Table

OlDonFrom “Ol’ Don’s” Drawing Table

“Ol’ Don” Burgdorf continues his regular series of patterns for WOM with this bonus pattern – The West.

To print the pattern, click here; the pattern will open in a new window, and should print on 8.5 x 11 paper. For Printing Hints, click here.

The-West

“Ol’ Don” Burgdorf is a carver and artist from Hohenwald, TN. Don’s feature “Doodles ‘n Notes for Carvin’ Folks” appears regularly in Chip Chats, and his patterns are now found in each issue of WOM and Carving Magazine. He has several pattern portfolios on a variety of subjects available for download from his website. For information about the portfolios and other custom services Don provides carvers, click here. Some of Don’s “Chattering Chippers” patterns can also be seen at the Woodcarver’s Porch pattern page.

Ol’ Don now has roughouts available for some of his patterns. You are invited to visit Ol’ Don’s home page, or email him at ol’don AT artofdon.com

Copyright 2011-2012 “Ol’ Don” Burgdorf. This Pattern may be copied for individual use; reproduction for resale is prohibited without express written permission.

From “Ol’ Don’s” Drawing Table

OlDonFrom “Ol’ Don’s” Drawing Table

“Ol’ Don” Burgdorf continues his regular series of patterns for WOM with It’s gonna be one of those days.

To print the pattern, click here; the pattern will open in a new window, and should print on 8.5 x 11 paper. For Printing Hints, click here.

It's-Gonna-Be-A-Bad-Day

“Ol’ Don” Burgdorf is a carver and artist from Hohenwald, TN. Don’s feature “Doodles ‘n Notes for Carvin’ Folks” appears regularly in Chip Chats, and his patterns are now found in each issue of WOM and Carving Magazine. He has several pattern portfolios on a variety of subjects available for download from his website. For information about the portfolios and other custom services Don provides carvers, click here. Some of Don’s “Chattering Chippers” patterns can also be seen at the Woodcarver’s Porch pattern page.

Ol’ Don now has roughouts available for some of his patterns. You are invited to visit Ol’ Don’s home page, or email him at ol’don AT artofdon.com

Copyright 2011-2012 “Ol’ Don” Burgdorf. This Pattern may be copied for individual use; reproduction for resale is prohibited without express written permission.

Finding And Collecting Cottonwood Bark, Part 3

Finding and Collecting Cottonwood Bark

By Alex Bisso

Part 3 – Tools for Collecting and Cleaning

 

I use a number to tools and equipment to safely collect and process bark:

Gloves – The outer crust on cottonwood bark can be very hard and abrasive and good gloves are important to avoid damage to your hands.  Whatever gloves you use, they are likely to wear out quickly if you handle a lot of bark.  Heavy cloth work gloves seem to hold up fairly well and are far superior to gloves made of soft leather.  Soft leather gloves feel good but are quickly ruined when handling bark.  Stiff leather work gloves hold up for quite a while before holes are worn in the finger tips.  One of my favorite type of gloves is a woven mesh glove that has a ribbed rubber coating on the palms and fingers.  These are very comfortable, especially in warm weather, and wear surprisingly well.

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Gloves Used To Collect Bark

Flat pry-bar and medium sized crowbar – My main tool for removing bark from a dead tree is a flat pry-bar.  Sometimes however it will not pry the bark far enough from the tree to free it and then the thicker crowbar comes in handy.  The crowbar also can serve as a hammer to drive the edge of the pry-bar into a bark crack to get it deep enough under the bark so it can be pried off.  Although I do most of the bark cleaning at home, the flat end of the pry-bar is useful for removing a lot crud from the back of the bark in the field.

Extension ladder and/or pole – I have found that these come in very handy when you find that there is good bark that is loosely attached to a standing tree and higher up the tree than you can reach.  This can be a hazardous operation so it is important to position yourself and/or the ladder behind and to the side of the area of bark that you plan to pry or push off the tree.  Sometimes when you push on a piece of bark you just knock of that piece, but sometimes when you push on a piece a huge slab (could be 2′ wide x 10′ tall or more) comes crashing down so you have to be careful.  Wearing a hard hat while doing this is also a good idea.

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Ladder and Long Pole

 Tools for transporting bark out of the woods – My favorite tool for this is a lightweight but strong, wide, shallow garden cart as it allows me to haul a very large amount of bark through fairly rough terrain.  I fill the lower part of the cart with smaller pieces which fit there and then start laying larger pieces lengthwise over the front and back edges of the cart.  I typically stack the bark on the cart in this manner up to 2.5 feet over the top edge of the cart.  Then I use several bungee cords hooked under the edge of the cart and over the bark to the other side to hold the bark in place during transport.  I also have a heavy canvas army duffle bag with shoulder straps that I like to wear when hiking through an area looking for sources.  This allows me to pack some select pieces out if I find anything good.  I have also used this to pack out bark from locations that were just too hard to get to with a cart.  If I find some really good bark a long way from reasonable access I sometimes bring a rigid backpack frame to the location to pack bark.  The one I have has a frame at the bottom that makes sort of a shelf that supports the bark.  To load it, I lay the backpack frame on the ground, back up, and carefully lay the best pieces of bark across the pack, stacking on it as many as I think I can handle.  Then I use both bungee cords and nylon straps to secure the bark to the frame.  To get it on my back I normally have to hoist the bottom of the frame up on a stump or log to hold it up as I get the straps over my shoulders.  Some years ago I used to do a lot of this but as I have gotten older I find it easier to accept that some bark is just too hard to get out to be worth collecting.

15-toolsCollect&haulsm

Cart, backpack and duffle bag used to haul out bark

 Getting it home – a pickup truck would be nice but since I do not have one I haul my bark either in the back and on top of my Chevy blazer or in a 4′ x 8′ x 2′ sides utility trailer.  Many times the locations where I find good bark are quite far, up to 150 miles, from where I live.  I do not mind going that far if I have located a really good bark source in an area that far away (usually done on a trip for other purposes) but when I do go to collect it I want to get as much as I can at a time so the Blazer and utility trailer are essential tools for me.

Bark Cleaning Tools – Most bark has lots of shredded cambium layer material and other crude on the back side that needs to be removed and a lot of bark is also dirty on the outside and should be cleaned before storage and use.  I do some cleaning of dirt and waste material off the back of the bark in the field with the wide, flat edge of the pry-bar but most is done at home.  If the weather is warm enough, I usually lay all of the bark that appears to be really dirty out on the grass in my yard and spray it with a hose and jet nozzle.  Bark pieces knocked from standing trees usually does not require this step.   After a day or two for drying I move the bark to a location where I clean any loose material from the back side.   My essential tool for this is a machete or bolo knife (and gloves of course).  I have a couple of bolo/machete type knives that I got on e-bay that are ideal for the job because the cutting edge of the blade is curved such that it fits in the inward curve on the back of the bark.  While I am doing this I also slice off any bark from the front that is badly delaminating and not solid enough for carving.

This year there was extensive flooding along the rivers and lots of bark was coated with a thick layer of silt.  Although I hosed bark more thoroughly than usual, when cleaning the back of it I noticed that it was still quite dirty and will need further cleaning before carving/finishing.  This is something I recommend be done with each piece of bark before it is carved and a good way to do it is in the sink or tub with liquid soap and a scrub brush.  This will not hurt the bark and will make it easier to carve and finish.  When it is too cold to water blast the bark I sometimes lay it out on the lawn and just sweep it with a broom – one pass of sweeping from each direction.  I have also found a hand brush or whisk broom to be useful to clean cobwebs and dust off pieces of bark as I select them for use or sale.

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Bark cleaning tools

Coming up in Part 4 – Bark Cleaning and Storage

 

Alex Bisso with a Cottonwood Monarch.

Alex Bisso with a Cottonwood Monarch.

 

Alex Bisso with a Cottonwood Monarch.

Alex Bisso is a woodcarver, and collector and seller of cottonwood bark and other found wood. To view some of Alex’s carvings and cottonwood bark supply at Be So Good Wood, click HERE.

The One Tree Project

The One Tree Project

By Dan Blair

(Editor’s Note – A version of this article originally appeared on the FC2 List.)

Ever heard of the One Tree project?  If you do an internet search on it, you will probably be as amazed as I was to see that it is much more than just a local activity.  In fact, it has grown to become almost a world-wide endeavor.  I was impressed to see how many places around the globe have been (or are currently) part of the program.  There is a lot to read about it online, and I admit I haven’t taken much time to enlighten myself with all there is to know about it.

Winter Phase Rainbow:Steelhead Trout03

Winter Phase Rainbow Pattern

I first became curious about the One Tree project when I was invited to take part in a comparable project here in south-central Alaska.  The gist of the idea is to take just one tree and see how many different items can be crafted from it.  In the case of the One Tree  project I joined, the tree was a tall birch tree that had to be removed to make way for the widening and reconstruction of a road.  I signed up and asked for a two foot + section of the trunk that is roughly 12 inches in diameter.  From the 30″ log they gave me, I split off most of one side to make myself a flat surface onto which I could trace the pattern for a 24″ winter phase rainbow/steelhead trout.  I intended to cut out the tracing on my bandsaw and then rough out the rest of the fish with the Lancelot Carver in my Makita 4″ grinder.  OOPS!  Bummer!

Wet wood does not bandsaw well.  Even though I had been drying this piece for five months or more, it was still quite wet inside.  Long story short, the blade bound up in the soft build-up of wet saw dust and….  “WHAM!!!!”  Broken blade.  I could have shut down and headed for Sears for a new blade, but that was a 10 mile round trip taking more time than I thought I had to spare.  Instead, I just attacked what was left with my Makita and that rotary chainsaw carving tool.

After roughing out the shape and basic features of the fish, I began the sanding process by using disc sanders in my Foredom tool.  Much of the sanding gets done that way when I am working on the bigger pieces.  And after that, I refine the sanding by switching to my soft-sander, the drum with “soft” foam rubber backing which can accept flat sandpaper in just about any grit you choose, other than the very coarsest sort.  (I most commonly use 80 and 120 grit.)

Winter Phase Rainbow:Steelhead Trout02

Winter Phase Rainbow

To give you a better picture of just what it is that I was carving, imagine the log standing upright on its widest end.   Consider that as a stump that a beaver, a logger, or the wind took down, and on which there is still a large spear of wood protruding skyward.  Then pretend you have caught a BIG trophy trout and are looking for the ideal way to display it for pictures before taking it home.  *!!!!*  Why not hang it, head up, from the top end of that snag?  Hey!  That works for me.  And so I did.

The next process was to make the birch stump look weathered.  For that, I went back to the Makita with the chainsaw and shaped the spear to a point and roughed in the creases and cracks that one would expect to see on weathered wood.  Before I finished the look of old wood on the upright portion, I primed and airbrushed the fish the way I normal would have except that I had to mask off the area that was not fish before the painting began.  Once the fish itself was painted, I could use a conventional brush to add the colors common to old and weathered driftwood, etc.  It worked!

Winter Phase Rainbow:Steelhead Trout01

Winter Phase Rainbow Finished!

Here is the finished carving.  I hope the results will encourage a lot more foks to get actively involved in their own One Tree project.  I highly recommend it to all of you in hopes that you will encourage your own carving clubs and organizations to look into having a One Tree project of your own at your next big get together.  I think it is a great idea and numerous One Tree projects around the world seem to agree.  Check it out and see if you do too.

Good luck and good carvin’….

Dan B ~ FC2 founder/moderator

 

Dan Blair is founder and a moderator of the Fish Carving 2 (FC2) Yahoo group.  See more of Dan’s instruction, tips and photos at Fish Carving A2Z, and Fish Alaska, other Yahoo groups

Artistry in Wood 2011 Gallery

Artistry In Wood 2011 Gallery

Photos by Marc Featherly

Click each of the following links to visit the various Gallery pages – when complete, close the gallery window to return here

AIW 2011 Gallery Page One Link

AIW 2011 Gallery Page Two Link

AIW 2011 Gallery Page Three Link

AIW 2011 Gallery Page Four Link

AIW 2011 Gallery Page Five Link

Artistry in Wood 2011

Artistry In Wood 2011

A MEMORY REVISITED


by Donald K. Mertz

The 2011 Artistry in Wood Show, Dayton, Ohio is now a distant memory.  Like all memories that stick in our minds, it is one to be revisited again and again.  The details of the memory may have faded because of being overwhelmed with 225 exhibitors filling over 300 display booths displaying wood carvings and wood working projects.  Visiting the 2012 Artistry in Wood Show November 10 and 11 will refresh the memory and make new memories.

Since 1981 AIW has grown into the nation’s premier showcase for art in wood, be it carving or woodworking. 4,800 visitors attended the 2011 show to be amazed and enthralled with the creativity epitomized in the great variety of wood sculpture and fine woodworking projects.

AIW stays true to its mission of providing a venue for woodcarvers to showcase their creativity in an aesthetic and welcoming exhibition hall as well as having top notch carvings entered into competition. Some of the best carvings one will see during the year are showcased at Dayton by carvers of merit from 22 states and Canada.  Most carvings on display are also for sale to the collector and gift giver who are looking for that one of a kind work of art. Also at the venue are top quality vendors of carving supplies, tools, wood and books to meet every carver’s need.

Entries into competition in both the woodworking and woodcarving divisions were not only beautiful works of art but were of top quality.  The judges had their work cut out for them with multiple categories containing several classes in each category to evaluate with thorough aesthetic and technical scrutiny.  Judges in Woodworking division were Roger Hornung, Jim McCann and Lary Sanders. Woodcarving division judges were Vic Hood, Stu Martin and Wayne Shinlever. 
Winners in the Best of Show in Woodcarving Division were:

  • Fred Zavadil (Windsor, Ontario, Canada), First
  • Terry Brasher (Petersburg, TN), Second
  • Sandy Czajka (Troy, OH), Third

In the Woodworking Division Best of Show winners were:

  • Jay Kinsinger (Cedarville, OH), First
  • Jim Dupler (Indianapolis, IN), Second
  • Richard Reese (Centerville, OH), Third

Free Demonstrations occurred both Saturday and Sunday to provide instructional information beneficial to carvers and woodworkers.  Demonstrations were presented by Cheryl Gustatson, Jack Miller, Floyd Rhadigan, Dave Arndt and Scott Phillips (longtime friend and supporter of AIW).

Woodcarving Illustrated hosted in their Spit-N-Whittle booth a number of one hour demonstrations by Tom Hindes, Floyd Rhadigan, Rick Jensen, Jim Willis, Jan Oegema, Bruce Nicholas, Vic Hood, Terry Brasher, Bruce Henn, Bob Stadtlander, Don Worley, Bob Biermann, Desiree Hajny and Don Mert.

As important as the carving aspect is for the show, even of greater importance is a charitable donation of $5,000 to United Rehabilitation Services, which to date after thirty shows totals $120,000. Added this year was a $500 gift to Partners Against Crime.

Next in importance seems to be recognition one carver each year with the Ron Ryan Award, announced during the Saturday night banque.  The 2011 recipient was Lynn Doughty of Jay, Oklahoma. The Ron Ryan Award honors someone each year who embodies the encouragement and advancement of woodcarving as Ron Ryan did in his lifetime.  The banquet itself is like a family reunion of carving friends who gather after a fun-filled day of meeting thousands of visitors to enjoy a meal, share in a raffle of choice donated gifts, and every banquet participant receives a donated door prize.

Western Ohio Woodworkers hosted a children’s hands-on workshop in which 260 children made over 450 projects from kits supplied by the WOW membership. Smiles were on children’s faces as they carried home a wood project they put together with the help of WOW members.  More importantly, each child created in their hearts of memory that will hopefully launch each child into a lifelong passion for making things with their own hands. During AIW’s two day show, members of WOW were also making toys for kids who are patients at Children’s Hospital.  This “Smile a Minute” activity assembled 287 toys that put smiles on children in the hospital.

The Special Exhibit of high end wooden trucks, tractors and heavy equipment was created by Scott Hamilton who graciously shared his astounding display to the amazement of exhibition visitors.

Revisit the AIW memory by visiting the www.daytoncarvers.com homepage which contains a video about the 2011 Show produced by webmaster Carole Williams. There is another two part video presented by Woodcraft that can be found on the “Artistry in Wood” Page.  Scott Phillips of The American Woodshop PBS program and longtime supporter and friend of AIW narrated the video provided by Woodcraft.  Woodcraft also donated a generous raffle prize at the banquet.